An Explanation of Comparative Law

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Comparative Law has been gaining in importance since the field of study started more than two centuries ago when the scholar Montesquieu wrote his book on it entitled De l’esprit des lois in 1748. The concept of Comparative Law boils down to comparing and contrasting different legal systems together. It has taken on importance over the last several decades due to increased globalization of world trade and companies needing to operate in unfamiliar legal systems. The second reason for it increased importance is the movement towards the harmonization of laws such as in the European Union as the different countries involved seek to work closer together.

One of the preeminent authorities on Comparative Law is Sujit Choudry. Choudry earned his Bachelors at McGill University and his Bachelors of Arts in Law at the University of Oxford. He went on to earn a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B) at the University of Toronto and earned his Masters of Laws at Harvard Law School in 1998. He started his professional career as a Law Clerk in the Supreme Court of Canada. He has since worked in a number of academic roles including the Global Visiting Professor of Law at the New York University School of Law, holding the Scholl Chair at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, and the Cecelia Goetz Professor of Law at the New York University School of Law. He presently serves as the I. Michael Heyman Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkley – School of Law. See this also for more.

Sujit Choudhry has served as an advisor for constitution building processes in a number of countries some of which are Libya, Sri Lanka, Ukraine, and Egypt. He has performed extensive research into managing a country’s transition from war-torn conflict to peaceful democracy. Among the huge number of areas he has studied are minority and group rights, federalism, constitutional courts, official language policy, and security sector oversight. Check this.

Sujit Choudry has written five books in his career about Comparative law. One of the books is his 2008 book “Constitutional Design for Divided Societies: Intergration or Accommodation?”. In this book he explores the opportunities and challenges that are raised by differences such as ethnic, religious, and cultural differences. Another book was “The Migration of Constitutional Ideas” in which he explains how constitutional systems influence each other and the relationship of national and supranational constitutionalism.

 

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